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THE POWER OF GREAT AFFECTION


I have been seized by the power of a great affection.

For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus; (1 Timothy 2:5 KJVA).

The question confronting us in this hour is the question Why?  Why did Jesus Christ die?  Why was it necessary?  Why did it have to happen? With this question others follow. What happened in Jesus' death?  How do we understand the sufferings of Jesus?  How do we understand what happened in this, the darkest hour in the history of the cosmos?

There is a part of me that says it is best not to venture forth here.  Standing before such a profound event as the death of Jesus Christ, we should simply cover our mouths in absolute silence.  For who are we to speak about such a matter?  But there is another part of me that asks how we can possibly be silent, when ignorance of such glorious truth leaves us in bondage.  How can we be silent when such errors abound about our blessed Lord's death, and when these errors leave a trail of human wreckage behind them? We are forced, as St. Hilary said, "to deal with unlawful matters, to scale perilous heights, to speak unutterable words, and to trespass forbidden ground,"  and to "strain the poor resources of our language to express thoughts too great for words.

Why did Jesus Christ die?  What happened in his death?

There is no more stunning news in the universe than the news that a human being now exists in heaven.  It was not an angel or a ghost that Stephen saw standing at the right hand of God in heaven.   It was Jesus.  It was the incarnate Son. Of all the things that we read about in the Bible, the most astonishing, the most shocking, the most mind-boggling is the ascension of the man Jesus, the incarnate Son.

Now let me ask another question. Is the fact that now and forever a human being, Jesus Christ, seated in the heavens as our mediator an afterthought?  Is the existence of the incarnate Son of God an afterword, plan "B," which God thought up and put into action after the failure of plan "A" in Adam? Is Jesus Christ a mere footnote to the Fall of Adam, a footnote that would have never been needed or written if Adam had not taken his plunge into ruin?  Or is Jesus the plan from all eternity? Is He the mystery of the gospel (Eph 5:19).  Is Jesus Christ, seated at the Father's right hand the eternal Word of God in and through and by and for whom all things were created?  I tell you, the ascension of the incarnate Son was on the books in heaven before Adam, and Adam's fall, were even ideas in God's mind.

As Paul says, the Father predestined us to adoption as sons and daughters through Jesus Christ (Eph 1:5). Verse four states this happened before the foundation of the world. How can you predestine the human race to adoption through Jesus Christ if the Word will not become flesh unless Adam falls into sin?  We have grossly underestimated the place of Jesus Christ in the whole scheme of things.

Shame on us, He is the alpha and the omega, not a footnote.  Jesus Christ does not fit into Adam's world.  Adam fits into Jesus Christ's world. 

Therefore, do not be ashamed of the testimony of our Lord, or of me His prisoner; but join with me in suffering for the gospel according to the power of God, who has saved us, not according to our works, but according to His own purpose and grace which was granted us in Christ Jesus from all eternity  (2TIM 1:8-9).

And only within this context comes the creation of the universe, which sets the stage upon which the drama of our adoption in Jesus Christ will be played out.  And within this context comes Adam, a mere man, who is given a place in the history of Jesus Christ, a place in preparation for the incarnation and the ascension of the incarnate Son. The Word of God  was already on the road to incarnation and to ascension before the universe was called into being (John 1:14). Before creation, our adoption–and its accomplishment in the ascension of the incarnate Son–was raised as the banner of all banners in highest heaven.

Most of the older Protestant theologies begin their discussions of the death of Jesus with the holiness of God and the law, and with human failure and the problem of sin.  They superimpose a legal structure over the heart of God and expound the death of Jesus under the heading of law and justice, guilt and punishment, but such an approach eclipses the eternal purpose of God for us, and thus utterly betrays the fact that there is something much more ancient about God's relationship with human beings than the law. 

Before there was ever any law, there was the irrepressible life and fellowship and joy of God.There was the decision to give human beings a place in the life of God through Jesus Christ.  The eternal purpose of God is not to place us under law and turn us into religious legalists; it is to include us in relationship, and give us a place in shared life and fellowship and joy.

The first thing to be said about the death of Jesus Christ, therefore, is that his death figures into the larger and stunning plan of God to include us in His life.  He was predestined to be the mediator between God and humanity, the one in whom nothing less than the life of God would be united with human existence.  Jesus' coming and his death are the living expression of the unwavering and single-minded devotion of the Father to His dreams for our adoption.  The reality that drives the coming of Jesus Christ, and pushes him even to the cross, is the relentless and determined passion of the Father to have us as His beloved children.  He will not abandon us.  It has never crossed the Father's mind to forsake His plans for us.  Jesus is the proof. 

Adam and Eve were created as the apex of all God's works and stood before God as the objects of His personal affection and great delight.  They were created to walk with God, to participate in God's work, and they were given a real place within God's unfolding drama.  But they listened to and believed the lie of the serpent, and in believing the lie, they distrusted God, and in that act of distrust and wrongheaded belief, they opened the door for evil to enter into God's good creation and find a foothold. 

Through the unbelief of Adam and Eve, darkness infiltrated the scene of human history.  And with that darkness, loneliness and fear, isolation and loss, guilt and sadness and sorrow set up shop inside the human soul.

What was God's response?  What was the reaction of God to such a disaster?  The response of the Father to Adam's plunge into ruin can be put into one word: No!  In that No! echoes the eternal Yes! of God to us.  Creation flows out of the fellowship of God, and out of the decision, the determined decision, to share His life with us.  That will of God for our blessing in Christ, that determined Yes! to us, translates into an intolerable No! in the teeth of the Fall.  God is for us and therefore opposed–utterly, eternally and passionately opposed–to our destruction. Paul said all the promises of God in Jesus are yes and in Him amen 2 Cor 1:20.

That opposition, that fiery and passionate and determined No! to the disaster of the Fall, is the proper understanding of the wrath of God.  Wrath is not the opposite of love.  Wrath is the love of God in action, in opposing action.  It is precisely because  God has spoken an eternal Yes! to the human race, a Yes! to life and fullness and joy for us, that the Fall and its disaster is met with a stout and intolerable No!  "This is not acceptable.  I did not create you to perish in the darkness, not you."  Therein the dream of the ascension and of our adoption in Christ becomes riddled with pain and tears and death.